• In search of a superhero

    by Carolyn Wyler

    As a child, I would grab makeshift items from around the house — such as an old red sheet, a toy ring from a gumball machine, and an old pair of my dad’s dark-rimmed glasses. Miraculously, the ring became a superhero diamond that could zap evil. The glasses allowed me to see the damsel (i.e. my best friend) tied to the train tracks miles away. The sheet, strewn around my back and tied to my neck, allowed me to fly faster than a speeding bullet and whisk my friend to safety, only seconds before the train roared rapidly over the tracks.

    I realize now that this childhood fantasy was all in preparation for my real life, self-proclaimed superhero status that I now live.

    Every Monday through Friday I don my uniform, disguise myself with a mask of foundation, eyeliner, mascara and lipstick, and throw on my dark rimmed glasses that enable me to see micro objects. These miniscule objects, until recently, were actually “normal” in size; however, for some age-based reason I can’t quite pin-point have become near impossible to see without my superhero glasses. Weird.

    I slip on my gold diamond magic power ring, a little smaller than it was when I first received it, yet it still retains the power to ward off charming, handsomely disguised evil men. I climb into my bright red, turbo-charged SUV (Superhero Utility Vessel), and zoom off to help fight micro-organisms, illnesses, and cardiovascular disease.

    In my own deluded mind I am a superhero. To others, however, this might not be so evident, as they see, a Fall (no longer spring) chicken Cardiology nurse — an irritant and a source of unwanted association as I inject them with an antiserum that will prevent them from getting the bird or swine flu.

    Others see me as a vexing annoyance in their daily “coach potato-consume-everything-in sight-eat-drink-and-be-merry-for-tomorrow-you-die” type of lifestyle. It behooves me to convince them that I am their hero and am trying to save their lives by informing them that if they wish to continue living, they must make some serious changes. We have a slogan in our cardiology unit: “Make a change, Make a difference.”

    When I’m not in uniform and on my off hours I’m constantly scoping my surroundings. I look around and see a person struggling financially and needing surgery but can’t afford to take the time off from work. I find myself trying to figure out a way to help. I see someone in pain from the recent loss of a mother and I honestly wish I had a power that could take away their mental anguish.

    I stand by helplessly and watch the country I love accumulate a build up of economical and political B.S. “plaque” along the inside of its arteries, knowing that unless the nation itself makes some major lifestyle changes, it could be at risk of suffering a massive M.I. (myocardial infarct or in layman’s term, a heart attack). As congress and the White House become overridden with Lex Luthers, we search frantically for Clark Kent, aka Superman (our idea of the ultimate and original superhero) to come to the rescue.

    There are many who “appear as wolves in sheep clothing” (or a hero’s cape) and promise they are here to “save the day,” but are in fact imposters and are only out for their own self -interest. Christian prophecy says that the Antichrist will first appear as a form of “Superman.” The real Superman, however, appears to have been lost in our own childhood fantasy world.

    From the struggling country, to people suffering from cancer, job losses, home foreclosures, and serious financial hardships, there are a seemingly endless number of people out there in need of a hero.

    As much as I desire to, I cannot cure every broken heart or lift every person’s burden. May I suggest another option? Stop searching for a superhero and instead, do as I have done and proclaim your self to BE one. Those in Washington and the 1% would do well to follow suit. I wouldn’t really necessarily care what suit they chose: Batman, Spiderman, Wonderwoman, Republican, Democrat, as long they wear that suit proudly and are honestly looking out for the best interests of everyone else. Perhaps then, we would “Make a change, Make a difference.”



    • We are all superheroes in some way. I think protest is what this country is made of and how you choose to be your own superhero works for me.


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 24, 2011 at 7:35 am
        • Reply

        Agreed



    • I want to be Lara Croft or Xena Warrior Princess so I can womp the people who have it comin’. Until then, I will have to womp with words.


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 23, 2011 at 1:47 pm
        • Reply

        Lol! Here’s to womping, menopause style! ; )


      • David Lacy

      • October 23, 2011 at 1:05 pm
      • Reply

      This is one of your best columns so far!


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 23, 2011 at 1:47 pm
        • Reply

        Thanks!


      • Jesse

      • October 24, 2011 at 8:32 pm
      • Reply

      I love it!~ By day I am a teacher Super Hero, wiping off that dumb smirk from hundreds of teenagers in a single comment. I make them sit up, embrace their endoskeleton and write complete sentences! I womp ’em good!


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 25, 2011 at 6:49 pm
        • Reply

        Thanks! Yeah, womb them good!



    • Best to stay in your own little shell and let others be the hero. Karma, love or caring (whatever you want to call it) is shared so interaction is never ending. It goes perfectly from you to another, and another, so on.No super hero can make anything go away until it has taught you what you need to know. Your mind is not deluted, you are a super hero only because you sit under a tree, within yourself, at peace with yourself. Only then can you see the plight of others as you do and only then will others know that you do see it. This small thing is enough to spur action on their part, thus they are fixing themselves just as you have fixed yourself. Others see what you do and they want to do it too, it’s not the doing, it’s the wanting to do that makes all the difference. This wonderful column of yours says just that on a large scale, thus, “You make a change and you make a difference” A superhero you are. (Yoda) You have spured me to want to be a better writer with a hope that you will know what I am trying to say. At least you will know that I like the words that you write, very much.


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 25, 2011 at 8:41 pm
        • Reply

        Well said Don and thank you.


      • Cari

      • October 29, 2011 at 4:13 pm
      • Reply

      That is so cool!!!! Great job!!


        • Carolyn Wyler

        • October 31, 2011 at 9:22 pm
        • Reply

        Thanks carie



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